Why Trying to Flee from Police in an RV Isn’t Smart

RV Isn't Smart

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A strange and potentially dangerous incident recently took place in Cottonwood County, Minnesota. Police in the town of Storden pursued a suspect who was attempting to flee from them driving a large RV. Needless to say the suspect didn’t make a clean getaway. In fact, he is lucky to have walked away from the pursuit completely unscathed.

Trying to flee from police in an RV isn’t a smart move. Your chances of success are fairly slim right from the start. And even if you did manage to get away temporarily, how easily could you hide an RV? Unfortunately, the suspect in the Minnesota case didn’t think these things through. Now he’s in jail.

A High-Speed Pursuit Through Town

According to a news report, the suspect was attempting to sell a truck to a local resident who had sold him his RV. The resident called police when he suspected the truck was stolen. Police arrived to observe the suspect, someone they had prior knowledge of due to previous interactions.

To make a long story short, the suspect jumped into his newly purchased RV and sped away. He led local police on a high-speed chase through town. At one point, he stopped outside of town, turned around, and sped back the way he came. He was going so fast that, at times, one of the RV’s front wheels was off the ground. Police say the suspect was lucky to have not flipped the RV over.

When all was said and done, the suspect was eventually apprehended. He has since been charged and is now awaiting court action. As for his RV, we can only assume it was impounded as evidence. He may never get it back.

Heavy and Unstable

Local reports do not say exactly how large the RV was. Furthermore, the fact that the RV was a motorhome is implied rather than clearly stated. None of that changes the fact that RVs are heavy and unstable regardless of form factor. Trying to outrun police with any type of RV is just foolish.

Is it possible that the suspect’s actions demonstrated how little knowledge he had of RVs? It is possible. Attempting to drive a heavy and unstable motorhome at a high enough speed to lift a front wheel off the ground shows a surprising lack of understanding. He is ignorant of either physics, RVs, or both.

If the RV in question was a Class A motorhome, the good folks at AirSkirts say trying to flee by leading police on a high-speed chase was pretty dangerous. Class A motorhomes are the largest of the large. They are the heaviest and most unstable.

For the record, AirSkirts makes inflatable RV skirting for all types of motorhomes, travel trailers, and fifth wheels. If the Minnesota suspect lacks sufficient knowledge of how big and heavy RVs are, he probably wouldn’t know anything about RV skirting either.

Success Wasn’t in the Cards

Any way you look at it, success was not in the cards for the suspect. It would have taken a miracle for him to get away in an RV. The fact that he didn’t is only evidence that criminal suspects aren’t the smartest people in the room. But when you are afraid of getting caught doing serious crimes, perhaps all logic escapes you.

Here’s hoping nobody else follows this particular suspect’s bad example. If you have ever thought about leading police on a high-speed pursuit from behind the wheel of an RV, forget about it. An RV is one of the worst choices you could make for such a feat.